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Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #6835

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    Ha, yeah; definitely on the overzealous side. 🙂 And, although I did realize it was a feature, rather than a bug, I was pleased, nonetheless, to find a workaround. (I mean, seriously; look how many commas I’ve used just in these three sentences…)

    Anyway, no need to hack it on my account. And, other people might want to use it…

  • #6542

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    Awesome!  I was hoping that would be the case, as I put rather more thought and effort into the comment than I’d like to see vanish into the Aether.  Thanks, @jackie!

  • #6519

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    Ha ha, yeah; it’s like when a spam email has “spam” in the subject line… ???

  • #6389

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    Man, I’m so glad @jackie reminded me about this thread — it’s gotten very interesting!

    I have to say, I definitely agree with @Alex Zorach (or is it @cazort ?) that it’s hard to reconcile Luxury and Idealism.  Luxury and ideals, sure; a person can have any sort of ideals about anything.  But I think of idealism as being, necessarily, tied up with non-materialistic values — prioritizing things like positive social change, holistic thinking, socioeconomic fairness…  Whereas luxury is, necessarily, socioeconomically divisive; that is to say, signifiers of luxury not only differentiate the luxury product from less luxurious products, but also differentiate the buyer of the product from other buyers of other (less luxurious) products.  I would say that part of the “point” of luxury items is to signify status.
    On the other hand, the question of value can be highly subjective: For example, I’m a great lover of many Apple products.  The argument could be very easily made that these are luxury products with a less favorable cost to value ratio as compared to other computers, phones, etc., with similar capabilities.  However, I find that the experience of interacting with these objects is very positive from an aesthetic perspective, much more so than the experience of interacting with the above-mentioned items of comparable capability.  Interacting with beautiful objects — be they handmade art objects or mechanically produced electronic appliances — has real value for me, for which I’m willing to exchange money.
    The fact I am able to make these particular choices is, however, a luxury on many levels.
  • #6516

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    Should we do a sort of self-policing thing, and report spam blogs?  ‘Cause this sure looks like one, here: http://verdaderos.teatra.de/

    Also, on the subject of amusing spam, check out Spamusement: http://spamusement.com/
    Seriously.  Can be hit or miss, but is mostly hit, as far as I’m concerned.
  • #6468

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    The Tao of Tea has some nice, attractively packaged, reasonably priced sampler sets: http://taooftea.com/shop.php3?scc=106

    And, as an aspiring tea educator, I vote for a book!  Possibly The True History of Teahttp://www.powells.com/biblio/62-9780500251461-0  I’ve only just started it myself, but I’ve heard good things from good people (http://chadao.blogspot.com/2010/01/readers-corner-dough-on-true-history-of.html). Also, it’s a very lovely and pleasing physical object.
  • #6382

    David Galli
    Participant
    @teachange

    What a daring move!  I don’t know whether to think Mr. Mehta is acting in a cynical fashion, or an idealistic one…

    The whole thing is totally fascinating and totally fraught!  I am definitely going to write something about it, as soon as I read about 30 relevant books. 🙂
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

David Galli

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@teachange

active 4 years, 11 months ago