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Viewing 25 posts - 51 through 75 (of 96 total)
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  • #9316

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Seems to me like the police/government should have listened to the tea workers’ complaints before it grew out of hand.

  • #9298

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Tea trade has added a lot of value to the community, I hope the financial issues can be resolved soon.

  • #9222

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Back on the topic about traffic, I looked at http://jasonowalker.wordpress.com/ and he showed some of his stats. He says that from 2 January to 25 June 2011, he had 7198 visits. That’s about 6 months, with 1,199 visits per month, or 40 per day.

    I’m not sure how he’s doing nowadays, but 40 per day in 2011 looks to me like an incredibly low volume, I was expecting his blog to make at least 300. I’m now averaging 30 visits per day according to google analytics, perhaps there’s some mistake with his/my data?

    Unless his traffic has now exploded, how he makes any significant money with such low numbers is beyond me. The niche site I referred to earlier makes less than a dollar a month from advertising, and it’s about 20 visits per day. Maybe he has an extremely high conversion rate, but I doubt it.

    He has a member’s section, perhaps that and sponsored posts are what sustain his site.

    Note that I’m not a blog expert, and I could be wrong, but I like to read about that topic.

    I learned at a webinar from problogger that a good daily number to reach for is 250 uniques per day, I’m shooting for at least 100, don’t know if it’s possible or not : )

  • #9187

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    I had posted but now it disappeared, maybe I accidentally deleted it when editing? Sorry about that.

    I wrote a guide for all Japanese tea types here (still under development but mostly done) http://www.myjapanesegreentea.com/types-of-japanese-green-tea

    Although Japanese teas are mostly green, the temperatures and brewing times vary considerably.

    I suggest a kyusu but not much hardware is needed, except maybe for matcha.Plus, the guidelines aren’t set in stone, start with the basics and then you’ll end up with what works best for you.

  • #9186

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    I received an email saying that the t-shirt didn’t reach the goal so it won’t be produced  : (

  • #9116

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Cool, I just ordered the t-shirt!

  • #9092

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    I think it’s a cool T-shirt.

    Problem is I live outside the US : (

  • #9091

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    @lazyliteratus no, I haven’t tried that yet, it’s hard to do in my small apartment : )

    I just roast in a pan.

  • #9081

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    My guess is that Starbucks is doing what Coca Cola has done before, buy up companies that sell products that indirectly compete with them.

    I think that tea will become even more popular from now on : )

  • #9080

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    @xavier I think for the most part it’s exported to the US, though. I’ve tried yerba mate but I’m not a big fan of it.

    Here in Colombia there’s some tea plantations too, but the tea ends up as bottled and flavored tea, like Lipton and Nestea.

  • #9074

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    I agree with @jackie, better to have a tea bag than no tea at all.

    I live in Colombia were coffee is the national product. Almost nobody has heard about loose-leaf tea here, and my friends think that I’m just weird : )

  • #9073

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Thanks @jackie, I haven’t checked G+ yet but will do so now.

  • #9071

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    I’m glad @lazyliteratus didn’t burn his kitchen down.

    I sometimes roast my own Houjicha, it’s very easy to do at home. Just put your bancha (or any other loose-leaf green tea) on a pan and roast until it gets brown.

    If you want to see some pictures, I wrote a blog post about it: http://www.myjapanesegreentea.com/how-to-roast-your-own-houjicha

  • #9010

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Oh, and about tenkaichi, from what I’ve seen it’s just a sencha blend. Not really a specific type of Japanese tea.

    I saw online that the company Kaburagien sells it, but I haven’t tried it yet.

  • #9009

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    @mbanu I’ll give you my two cents with the Japanese teas:

    Kamairicha is by definition made through panfrying (as opposed to steaming), and it further divides into two types of tea.

    Nikkan, or hiboshi (meaning sun dried) bancha is a type of bancha that is sun-dried. Some examples are: kyobancha, yoshino nikkan bancha, and kageboshi bancha.

    These sun dried teas are different than the standard bancha and sencha. They aren’t as popular, so outside of Japan it’s not easy to purchase them. Consider them “souvenir teas” so to speak, because they are made in their respective area only and usually not in a large scale.

    I’m making a very detailed list of Japanese teas, and will be adding all the sun dried teas too. I’m not finished yet, but I’m adding one each week. Tomorrow I’ll publish the article on kyobancha. This is the link for the types of Japanese green tea. Hope that you’ll find it useful.

  • #8998

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Thanks for the link, @peter.

    I hope that we all get access to the list of unethical tea plantations. It’s very sad that there’s still modern slavery in today’s world.

  • #8993

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    @seule771 I’m sorry to hear that. I think you’re probably depressed, it’s happened to me too. I wish you the best and that fortune may smile upon you in the near future.

  • #8817

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    @bram that’s interesting, people began to buy expensive tea just for the sake of showing off!

  • #8812

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    So in other words the old cakes are more of a collector’s item, but it doesn’t have anything to do with the quality of the tea leaves?

  • #8795

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    It doesn’t have to be Japanese, what I mean is that they can just be called powdered teas instead of matcha, which comes from tencha only.

    Just like caviar comes from a certain fish, champagne is only a sparkling wine from a certain region, a truffle is just a mushroom.

    Why are powdered teas being called matcha, because it gives them more status? Could be.

  • #8697

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    @liberties the powdered genmaicha sounds fun, I’ll write down a note and someday try to powder it myself.

    I’m not against powdered teas, I just want them to be named fairly. Can’t it just be powdered oolong? Matcha has a deep respect as a ceremonial drink, besides the Chinese and Japanese aren’t the best of friends, why mix a tea’s identity, both are diminished that way.

    The same happens if I took ingredients from my country, mixed them with seafood and rice, and called it a Colombian paella. I’m sure the Spanish people wouldn’t be happy about it. It’s best to name it some other way.

  • #8696

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    I agree that tea as a topic doesn’t have the same potential for readership as other topics. I’m not sure how successful can a tea blog be if everything was done right.

    In my case I get about 15 visitors a day. I write every week, promote my posts through social media and participate in forums.

    For another topic (cooking utensils) I have a static mini site, no updates and only a few articles. I don’t do social media with it or anything else, my name’s not even in it, I just wanted to see if I could place ads and maybe profit. It didn’t work, and I hate writing about the topic, but it does get about the same traffic as my tea blog, which I work much harder on.

  • #8686

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Great project,wish you the best of luck and that we can taste the tea on 2019!

  • #8685

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Literally matcha does mean powdered tea. Makkou, for example, has the same initial symbol and it means incense powder. However, funmatsucha also means powdered tea, and that’s the term used for all other powdered teas.

    The point is, matcha isn’t just powdered green tea. It’s powdered tencha. If you took, say, sencha or bancha leaves and ground them into a powder, its not matcha but funmatsucha by default.

    Its not arbitrary either, you can notice it in the taste and as I said before L-theanine content. A powdered sencha will taste way too bitter, you would notice the lower quality that way.

    Here’s a link to my article on matcha, just in case:

    Matcha

  • #8680

    riccaicedo
    Participant
    @riccaicedo

    Black matcha isn’t the original matcha, because it’s made of black tea instead of green tea (tencha).

    I think it shouldn’t be called matcha, in Japan only tea powder made from tencha is called matcha, the rest are just powdered teas (funmatsucha).

    Besides, those powdered teas called black matcha aren’t Japanese teas, why use a Japanese name?

    Original matcha is high in L-theanine because of the special shading in the cultivation process. That’s the same for gyokuro, and the reason why both are so expensive.

    But to be honest, I haven’t tried black matcha yet.

Viewing 25 posts - 51 through 75 (of 96 total)

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@riccaicedo

active 7 months, 1 week ago