8 replies, 3 voices Last updated by  Xavier 4 years, 3 months ago
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  • #10245

    Xavier
    Participant
    @xavier

    I read earlier today this blog post on tea in Germany.

    http://www.tching.com/2013/08/tea-in-germany-u-s-food-and-beverage-industry-take-note/

  • #10246

    bram
    Participant
    @bram

    There might be hope for my neighbours… 🙂

  • #10249

    Xavier
    Participant
    @xavier

    And for @lahikmajoe.

  • #10252

    peter
    Keymaster
    @peter

    Hmph, the writer of the article presents it like tea is a surprise in Germany. Not really, the Germans have been doing tea for a long time, and doing it well too. It seems to me, that the writer probably just wan’t paying attention very well during her last trip.

    It had been six years since our last visit to Germany.  During that last trip, there were TeeGschwendner outlets to be sure, but tea had yet to imprint itself on the collective consciousness of the German people.  During our trip last month, though, I was delighted to witness the in-roads tea had made during the intervening years.

    There is no shortage of tea in Germany and you can even buy loose tea in grocery stores (of varying quality) and this has been the case for a very long time.  The writer seems not to know that Hamburg was a major tea port for Europe for ages – even today, a significant portion of Europe’s tea comes through Hamburg. The Germans are very savvy on tea. When I lived in Germany (nearly 8 years ago now) with @jackie, tea was pretty easy to find. Sure it helped that Jackie knew where to get it, but either way, it seems strange to act like tea is something knew to Germans.

    I’ll be leaving a similar comment to this on that blog post too, hope I can manage to remain diplomatic…

  • #10253

    bram
    Participant
    @bram

    I had the same feeling. I don’t know how it was in the past, except for the Ostfrisian and Hamburg area,  which have always been different from the rest of Germany when it comes to tea. As far as I know tea was not that hot in the rest of the country, but it existed. So I wondered whether the author’s skill to find teashops improved or that it became easier to find (quality) teashops since they (seem to) pop up everywhere in the last few decades.

  • #10255

    Xavier
    Participant
    @xavier

    Or the author wanted to show the differences between Germany and the USA.

    But it can have become easier to find teashops, especially in Southern Germany.

    As for not knowing all about tea in Europe…

  • #10258

    peter
    Keymaster
    @peter

    Shame, I added a comment to that blog post last week but it never posted. Looks like it never made it out of moderation…

    Makes me think that T-Ching is not interested in critical or thoughtful commentary.

  • #10259

    bram
    Participant
    @bram

    I had once posted a comment on that site that took a while to get through. So it might still hang in there.

  • #10260

    Xavier
    Participant
    @xavier

    Wait and see @peter

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